i18n

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Universal Acceptance of non-Latin email addresses and domain names: how does your framework rate? (IUC41 presentation)

Posted by Jim DeLaHunt on 31 Oct 2017 | Tagged as: Unicode, i18n, meetings and conferences, multilingual, web technology

One of my treats each year is to attend the Internationalization and Unicode Conference. This year was the 41st conference, or IUC41.  As I often do, I made a presentation. This year, the title was, Universal Acceptance of non-Latin email addresses and domain names: how does your framework rate? I’d like to share my slides. Continue Reading »

A Technology Globalization meetup for the Vancouver Area: (3) Where, When, and How

Posted by Jim DeLaHunt on 28 Feb 2015 | Tagged as: Unicode, Vancouver, culture, i18n, language, meetings and conferences, multilingual, software engineering

Our little meetup now has a name: Vancouver Globalization and Localization Users Group, or VanGLUG for short. Follow us as @VanGLUG on Twitter.  We had an outreach meeting in late January. So it’s long past time to conclude this series of thoughts about VanGLUG. Part 3 discusses “Where, When, and How”. Earlier in the series were A Technology Globalization meetup for the Vancouver Area: (1) What, Who (Oct 31, 2014), and A Technology Globalization meetup for the Vancouver Area: (2) Why, Naming (Dec 31, 2014).

Where

One challenge of an in-person meeting is where to hold it. The usual habit for such events is to meet in downtown Vancouver. This can be inconvenient, not to mention tedious, for those of us in Surrey or Burnaby. But I expect this is how we will start.

I would, however, be delighted if there was enough interest in other parts of the Lower Mainland to start up satellite groups in other locations as well.

Could we meet virtually?  In this day and age, it should be cheap and practical to do a simple webcast of meetings. Some may want to participate remotely. An IRC channel or Twitter “second screen” may emerge. But in my experience, the networking which I suspect will be our biggest contribution will come from in-person attendance.

When

In an era of busy schedules, finding a time to meet is likely an overconstrained problem. Our technology industry tends to hold meetings like this on weekday evenings, sometimes over beer, and I suspect that is how we will start. But it is interesting to consider breakfast or lunch meetings.

When to get started?  The arrival of Localization World 2014 in Vancouver got a dozen local localization people to attend, and provided the impetus to turn interest into concrete plans. After Localization world, we started communicating and planning. The net result was a first meeting in mid-day of Monday, December 8, 2014. Despite the holiday distraction, we were able to land a spot guest-presenting to VanDev on 6 essentials every developer should know about international. Our next opportunity to meet will likely be April 2015, perhaps March.

How

The Twitter feed @VanGLUG was our first communications channel. I encourage any Twitter user interested in monitoring this effort to follow @VanGLUG. We have 37 followers at the moment. We were using the twitter handle @IMLIG1604 before, and changed that name while keeping our followers. The present @IMLIG1604 handle is a mop-up account, to point stragglers to @VanGLUG.We created a group on LinkedIn to use as a discussion forum. This has the snappy and memorable URL https://www.linkedin.com/groups?home=&gid=6805530. If you use LinkedIn, are in the Lower Mainland or nearby, and are interested in localization and related disciplines, we welcome you joining the LinkedIn Group. We are also accepting members from out of area (for instance, Washington and Oregon) in the interests of cross-group coordination. But for location-independent localization or globalization discussion, there are more appropriate groups already on LinkedIn.

Subsequent communications channels might perhaps include a Meetup group (if we want to put up the money), an email list, an outpost on a Facebook page, and other channels as there is interest.

GALA (the Globalization and Language Association) is one of our industry organisations. It has a membership and affiliate list that includes people from the Vancouver region. I spoke with one of their staff at Localization World. They are interested in encouraging local community groups. I believe this initiative is directly in line with their interest: we can be the local GALA community for here.  They have included us in a list of regional Localization User Groups. We are also on IMUG’s list of “IMUG-style” groups.
Do you want to see this meetup grow? If so, I welcome your input and participation. You can tweet to @VanGLUG, post comments on this blog, or send me email at jdlh “at” jdlh.com. Call me at +1-604-376-8953.

See you at the meetings!

A Technology Globalization meetup for the Vancouver Area: (2) Why, Naming

Posted by Jim DeLaHunt on 31 Dec 2014 | Tagged as: Unicode, Vancouver, culture, i18n, language, meetings and conferences, multilingual, software engineering

I am helping to start a regular face-to-face event series which will bring together the people in the Vancouver area who work in technology globalization, internationalization, localization, and translation (GILT) for networking and learning. This post is the second in a series where I put into words my percolating thoughts about this group.  See also, A Technology Globalization meetup for the Vancouver Area: (1) What, Who (Oct 31, 2014).

Happily, this group has already started. We held our first meeting on Monday, Dec 8, 2014. Our placeholder Twitter feed is @imlig1604; follow that and you’ll stay connected when we pick our final name. And we have a group on LinkedIn for sharing ideas. The link isn’t very memorable, but go to LinkedIn Groups and search for “Vancouver localization”; you will find us. (We don’t yet have an account on the Meetup.com service.)  If you are in the Lower Mainland and are interested, I would welcome your participation.

Continuing with my reflections about this group, here are thoughts on why this group should exist, and what it might be named.

Continue Reading »

A Technology Globalization meetup for the Vancouver Area: (1) What, Who

Posted by Jim DeLaHunt on 31 Oct 2014 | Tagged as: Unicode, Vancouver, i18n, language, meetings and conferences, multilingual, software engineering

The time has come, I believe, for a regular face-to-face event series which will bring together the people in the Vancouver area who work in technology globalization, internationalization, localization, and translation (GILT) for networking and learning.  The Vancouver tech community is large enough that we have a substantial GILT population. In the last few weeks, I’ve heard from several of us who are interested in making something happen. My ambition is to start this series off by mid-December 2014.

Continue Reading »

A good-practice list of i18n API functionality

Posted by Jim DeLaHunt on 30 Nov 2013 | Tagged as: culture, i18n, meetings and conferences, multilingual, software engineering, web technology

Think of the applications programming interface (API) for an application environment: an operating system, a markup language, a language’s standard library. What internationalisation (i18n) functionality would you expect to see in such an API? There are some obvious candidates: a text string substitution-from-resources capability like gettext(). A mechanism for formatting dates, numbers, and currencies in culturally appropriate ways. Data formats for text that can handle text in a variety of languages. Some way to to determine what cultural conventions and language the user prefers. There is clearly a whole list one could make.

Wouldn’t it be interesting, and useful, to have such a list?  Probably many organisations have made such lists in the past. Who has made such a list? Are they willing to share it with the internationalisation and localisation community? Is there value in developing a “good practices” statement with such a list?  And, most importantly, who would like to read such a list? How would it help them? In what way would such a list add value? Continue Reading »

I18n and Unicode conference, and tutorial on multilingual Drupal and Joomla web sites, complete

Posted by Jim DeLaHunt on 31 Oct 2012 | Tagged as: CMS, Joomla, Unicode, culture, digital preservation, drupal, i18n, meetings and conferences, multilingual

Another stimulating Internationalisation and Unicode Conference (IUC36) just finished up last week (October 22-24, 2012). As usual it was rich with interesting people, stimulating subjects, and inspiration. My tutorial, Building multilingual websites in Drupal 7 and Joomla! 2.5, was well-attended and seemed to go well. My final paper and slides are posted at the preceding link.

Continue Reading »

Choosing between UTF-8 and UTF-16: which has the better bytes-per-character ratio?

Posted by Jim DeLaHunt on 31 Dec 2010 | Tagged as: Unicode, i18n, language, software engineering

Software engineers sometimes are called on to specify which encoding a text file format should use.  These days, the top contenders for encoding are UTF-8 and UTF-16, both based on the Unicode Standard. One factor (amongst several, and perhaps not the most compelling) in choosing between them is storage efficiency: the number of bytes per character, or amount of storage per unit of text. If a given text takes a kilobyte of storage in UTF-8 and twice that in UTF-16, that’s a difference, which may be meaningful.

I recently looked for quantitative data about space efficiency of UTF-8 and UTF-16, and couldn’t find very much. Engineering discussions about storage efficiency are better informed by quantitative data than by opinion and supposition. I want to give one morsel of quantitative data more visibility, and clarify this issue. Continue Reading »

Building Multilingual Websites in Drupal and Joomla, at IUC34

Posted by Jim DeLaHunt on 31 Oct 2010 | Tagged as: CMS, Joomla, Unicode, drupal, i18n, meetings and conferences, multilingual

Once again I was fortunate enough to be invited to present at this year’s Internationalization and Unicode Conference (IUC). I have posted the paper and slides for my tutorial, Building Multilingual Websites in Drupal and Joomla, over on jdlh.com.

This was my abstract, from the Unicode conference program for my talk: Continue Reading »

How about an IMLIG (Internationalisation, Multilingual, Localisation Interest Group) for Vancouver?

Posted by Jim DeLaHunt on 27 Jun 2010 | Tagged as: Unicode, Vancouver, i18n, language, meetings and conferences, multilingual, web technology

There is a lot of international, multilingual, and multicultural activity in Vancouver. Also, there’s a thriving tech scene. But there’s no place for the people in the intersection of those two circles — those interested in and working on the internationalisation, localisation, and multilingual aspects of technology projects — to get together and share ideas. I think there ought to be.

And I’ll even propose a name: IMLIG1604, the I18n L10n M11l I6t G3p (Internationalisation, Localisation, and Multilingual Interest Group) for North America’s 604 area code. If you can decipher the title, you’re in the club!

Continue Reading »

Will Machine-only Translation Always Fall Short?

Posted by Jim DeLaHunt on 22 Jun 2009 | Tagged as: culture, i18n, language

I encountered a new blog from my i18n tribe today, Localization Best Practices. Their post, “Pidgins and Creoles” or “Why Machine-only Translation Will Always Fall Short”, caught my eye.  It is interesting, even if I don’t fully agree with them.

Jonathan writes that, at a recent conference on localisation:

…an audience member asked me about machine translation, and if it would ever completely take the place of human linguists in the industry. I answered “No,” although I did concede that machine translation is consistently making strides and does have a place in the localization community. He then mentioned that a scientific group in Europe recently had success with a robot performing a live human appendectomy. He believed that if something that delicate could be automated, what made something a “simple” as language beyond the scope of machines and artificial intelligence?  I thought about his question and then simply said, “Because there are no pidgins or creoles for appendectomies.” Continue Reading »

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